Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
KQEH (PBS) 25
KCSM (PBS) 5
KRCB (PBS) 4
WETA 4
KQED (PBS) 3
WHUT (Howard University Television) 3
LANGUAGE
English 44
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Dec 9, 2012 6:30pm PST
owning a newspaper and radio and tv stations in the same big city. thus he would give the massive media companies free rein to devour more of the competition. the chairman is julius genachowski, appointed to the job by president barack obama. now, the fcc tried to pull this same stunt under a republica chairman back in the second term of george w. bush, but at hearings held around the country an angry public fought back. >> we told you a year ago when you came to seattle that media consolidation is a patently bad idea. no "ifs," "ands," or "buts" about it. so with all due respect i ask you, what part of that didn't you understand? >> i'm a republican and i'm a capitalist, but some areas of our private sector must be regulated. freedom of information is too important, we must be oactive in protecting that fundamental freedom. >> if the fcc is here wanting to know if chicago's residents are being wewell served, the answers no. if local talent is being covered, the answer is no. if community issues are being treated sensitively, the answer is no. if minority groups are getting the coverage
PBS
Dec 30, 2012 6:30pm PST
the center of new york city having cable, lights, electricity. chinese guy upstairs. right next door a korean person. downstairs somebody from uruguay. the folkwho e on the television, talking about all sorts of crazy stuff. i mean, sure, realism might try to approach that. but in my mind, when i was a kid, when i read about time travel. time travel felt like a much more honest description, to me, of what that meant, being transported from santo domingo '74 to new york and new jersey in '74. that was far more honest to the experience than anything i could have written realistically. >> at the age of six, you came? >> yeah, yeah. yeah, and for a young mind, mean, it's an extraordinary leap. it's an extraordinary leap. and i think science fiction, i think fantasy, i think the genres do a wonderful job of describing all parts of, many parts of our society that realism doesn't do a great job of describing. >> didn't you say somewhere that "starwar" the "star wars ories, yououldt ha a better framework f dratic alys or storytelling than "star wars"? ♪ >> i love to teach those as structures. they'
PBS
Dec 2, 2012 6:30pm PST
, cities stripped. at night, the sea, barbaric bellows stifled, sprawls outside the window, framed like a dark, unruly landscape. behind us is a darker kind of dark: i watch your eyes for signals. the music makes a pause for prophecy: 'tomorrow, off-shore breezes and warmth to each other's warmth,' we do not listen." >> that was how long ago? >> 1968. >> you had been married -- >> we had been married 18 years, at that point. >> how does love change from then to now? >> it's more profound and more essential. it was very strong right from the beginning. we met on the first day of french class at northwestern university in 1946. and we've been together ever since. >> she became a playwright, didn't she? >> she was a playwright. and her plays have been produced about 60 times in mostly new york and los angeles. and i appreciate her work on my poetry and other things i write. she is a wonderful critic. four years ago, she had a stroke. and that kind of put an end to her writing. so that was a very sad thrust. >> i'm curious as to this poem, "this year's valentine." where did that come from?
PBS
Dec 16, 2012 6:30pm PST
. it -- >> this city alone, where we're sitting, new york city, needs $50 billion to repair from the hurricane. >> once you get it rolling, there is plenty of stuff to do. so the notion that we don't have things that need to be done that could employ lots of people from very low-skilled people to more middle and high-skilled people, that's just a myth. >> there was a poll just the other day that you probably saw. something like half of all republicans believe that the 2012 election was stolen for obama by a group called acorn, which was -- which went out of business several years ago. it doesn't even exist. i mean, they just believe these conspiracy theories. and they circulate without barrier, because nobody will say anything to disagree with it. and if you hear the same propaganda over and over and over again, eventually you're going to start to believe it. >> there's this tremendous amount of brainwashing that goes on. and i don't understand how it happens. people convince themselves, you can understand it more in the public companies, because these guys have to get up and tell things to shareholder
PBS
Dec 23, 2012 6:30pm PST
? an elementary school student near salt lake city brought a gun to school saying he wanted to protect his friends. instead, he allegedly used it to threaten his classmates. as the good book say, get with it. train up a child, and when he is old, he will not depart for it. ready, aim, fire. for the child who has everything this season, how about body armor? a utah company named amendment two offers a new line of it for kids. mother jones magazine reports sales have tripled in one week. a massachusetts company is promoting the bullet blocker, a rugged computer backpack designed for work or play, made of the same materials used in bulletproof police vests currently on sale for the holidays for $199.99. on facebook, an outfit called black dragon tactical that sells vests and other combat gear sent this message. arm the teachers. in the meantime, bulletproof the kids. this market never closes. america's turned violence into a profit center. if you haven't finished your christmas shopping, no need to wait for santa. his sleigh couldn't even hold the heavy weapons. step this way. black friday is every d
PBS
Dec 9, 2012 8:00am PST
." as the youngest mayor of a top 50 u.s. city, my guest today symbolizes the emergence of a new generation of latinos in american political life-- the mayor of san antonio, texas, julian castro. i'm maria hinojosa, this is one on one. mayor julian castro, welcome to our program. >> thank you very much for having me. >> hinojosa: so your mom was a big time political activist in the 1960s and 1970s-- chicana activist. your brother is in state government in texas. you're the youngest mayor... or one of the youngest mayors in the country, san antonio, and people are saying, "this family has got a political future." so is that kind of the way you had it all planned out? >> oh, it's... well, that's the way that it's working right now, it seems, but not the way that we planned out. >> hinojosa: so you didn't even think, like, when you were a kid you were like, "i'm going to become a politician like my mom." >> no. you know what's interesting was that because my mother was so involved at that time in different mexican american issues and women's issues, she would drag us to political rallies, to m
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)